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Hookuaaina Rebuilding Lives From The Ground Up

Aloha Kekahi I Kekahi

Do the people in your life know how much aloha you have for them?
How about the strangers you bump into on any given day? Do they know and experience your aloha?

What does aloha look like?
What does it sound like?
What does it feel like?

Aloha kekahi i kekahi, the call to love one another, is the standard expectation set at Kapalai. This is no easy task. We all have been faced with the stress and busy-ness of life or have found ourselves in situations where our patience is tested. Unfortunately, it is often most challenging to be loving and compassionate to others in these moments, especially those who are closest to us. While difficult, these situations also provide amazing opportunities to demonstrate true aloha as we choose to put our best selves forward.

Through this ʻōlelo noʻeau we are reminded of the importance of consistently demonstrating aloha to others. It does not say that we should only aloha kekahi i kekahi sometimes or when we feel like it or when it is convenient. Rather, the call is to love one another always, even in moments when it is difficult. Rather than demanding love and respect or withholding our love and compassion until it is earned, we are challenged to take the first step in sharing our aloha.

All of this builds on the foundation of Nani Ke Kalo where we are reminded that our lives have intrinsic value and purpose. Once we learn to truly respect ourselves, we can begin to respect and honor others, and it is from this place that aloha flows.

Inquiry

  • What does aloha mean to you? Why is it important?
  • How do you show aloha to others? 
  • In what ways do others express their aloha to you?
  • What are ways we can practice aloha kekahi i kekahi at home? At school? In our communities? 

Vocabulary

  • Aloha: Love, affection, compassion, mercy, grace
  • Kekahi: one
  • Kilo: To observe, watch closely

Moʻolelo

Keahiakahoe
View The Moʻolelo: Keahiakahoe Here Reflection Questions
  • In what ways did the characters in this moʻolelo express aloha for one another? In what ways did they fail to do so?
  • What life lessons might we learn from this moʻolelo? How might it connect with our ʻōlelo noʻeau?
Mākālei
View The Moʻolelo: Mākālei Here Reflection Questions
  • In the moʻolelo of Mākālei, what happened to Kahinihiniʻula? How was he treated? What was the result of this?
  • What was Olomana’s reaction once he realized what had happened to Kahinihiniʻula? Did he agree or disagree with his kahuna? What did Olomana do instead?
  • What does this moʻolelo teach us about the importance of respect and valuing all members of the ʻohana/community?
  • In what ways did the characters in this moʻolelo express aloha for one another? In what ways did they fail to do so?
  • What life lessons might we learn from this moʻolelo? How might it connect with our ʻōlelo noʻeau?
Palila
View The Moʻolelo: Palila Here Reflection Questions
  • What is significant about the relationship between Hina and Palila in this moʻolelo? How did they demonstrate aloha for one another? What does this teach us?
  • How did Olomana treat the kanaka on Oʻahu? Did he demonstrate aloha for those around him? What happened to him in the end?
  • What life lessons might we learn from this moʻolelo? How might it connect with our ʻōlelo noʻeau?

Possible Extension Activities

Nani Ke Kalo - Identity
Get a jar or a notebook and write down one positive attribute about yourself each day. Be as consistent as possible, committing to record something positive every day. Every week, go back and reread what you have written, reminding yourself about your own importance and the truth of who you are.
Acts of Aloha
Commit to completing at least one act of aloha each day. You may choose to record these as you complete them and occasionally go back and reflect on the impact your choice to aloha others is having on yourself and the world. Some ideas include:
  • Speak life by offering words of encouragement
  • Give selflessly
  • Serve and help where it is needed
  • Choose to respond with grace, even when it is challenging
  • Forgive
Kilo (Observations)
Using as many senses as possible, what do you notice about the ʻāina (including fresh and saltwater resources) in your area? Record these items in our Kilo Journal or in a notebook and track them over time.
  • What plants and animals are growing? What do they sound, smell, and feel like (as appropriate)? Do they change at different times of the day or year?
  • When does it rain? What does the rain look, sound, smell, feel, and taste like? Are there different types of rains that I notice? What are their characteristics? Where and when do the clouds gather? Are there different types of clouds that come around at different times of the day or at different times of the year?
  • What do our streams, rivers, and springs look like? Do they change over time? What does the rain look, sound, smell, and feel like?
  • What is happening in the ocean? What do you see, smell, hear, feel (and taste if appropriate)? Does the activity (waves, animals, limu, etc.) change at different times of the day or year? Are there different types of fish, limu, or other animals present at different types of the year?
Māla ʻAi (Food Garden)

Find ways to plant and care for kalo at home. If you have a yard, create a māla (garden) by finding an area that will provide you adequate water and sunlight. Your kalo will likely need to be watered at least once a day and will do well in full sunlight. If you do not have ʻāina to plant your kalo, you could mix your soil and compost and plant them in a large bin or 5-gallon bucket.
  • Math: Measure the area needed to plant the kalo. Create a sketch of the area with a key that includes your measurement scale. Be sure to map out where you will plant your kalo. Each kalo should be around one haʻilima (from elbow to fingertip) apart.
  • Science: Prepare the soil mixing it with natural organic fertilizers and/or compost before planting. Do daily observations of your kalo and other things in the ʻāina. You can record this data along with measurements on a data table or use our Kilo Journal
  • English: Write poems, reflections, or short stories about your kalo and māla.
  • Social Studies: Research the significance of kalo to the Hawaiian people, others in the Pacific, and those around the world.
Reflection Questions
  • As you take time to kilo and to care for your kalo and other food, what does it teach you about the importance of listening and observing? How are these actions an expression of respect and aloha? How do they help us to know how to care for others better?
  • How are tasks like watering and pulling weeds essential to the healthy growth of your kalo? What happens when you do or don’t do these things?
  • How is this similar to how we care for ourselves and others? What are the things that we need to clear out? What are things that “water” us and keep us healthy and happy?

Content on this page was written and compiled by Danielle Espiritu, Education Specialist

Hookuaaina Rebuilding Lives From The Ground Up

Hoʻokuaʻāina is located in the ahupuaʻa of Kailua at Kapalai in Maunawili on the island of Oʻahu.

For more information about our programs or how you can get involved please contact us.

visit us

916E Auloa Rd.

Kailua, HI 96734

mail

P.O. Box 342146

Kailua, HI 96734

follow us

Hookuaaina Rebuilding Lives From The Ground Up

Hoʻokuaʻāina is located in the ahupuaʻa of Kailua at Kapalai in Maunawili on the island of Oʻahu.

For more information about our programs or how you can get involved please contact us.

visit us

916E Auloa Rd.

Kailua, HI 96734

mail us

P.O. Box 342146

Kailua, HI 96734

email us

Reach Us At:

info@hookuaaina.org

follow us

Hoʻokuaʻāina is a 501c3 Non-Profit Organization

© Hoʻokuaʻāina 2020 All Rights Reserved | Terms & Conditions | Privacy | Site By Created By Kaui

Hoʻokuaʻāina is a 501c3 Non-Profit Organization

© Hoʻokuaʻāina 2020 All Rights Reserved | Terms & Conditions | Privacy | Site By Created By Kaui

Hoʻokuaʻāina is a 501c3 Non-Profit Organization

© Hoʻokuaʻāina 2020 All Rights Reserved | Terms & Conditions | Privacy

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