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Hookuaaina Rebuilding Lives From The Ground Up

Hawaiian ValueS-Based Lessons

Each quarter we focus on one of our core Hawaiian values. A variety of lessons based on the theme have been developed as a resource for our teachers, schools, and mentoring program participants to supplement the hands-on learning that occurs onsite.

Q1: Nani ke kalo - Respect

As a main staple of the Hawaiian people, kalo is considered sacred and treated with great respect. To lay the foundation for the year, students are introduced to the mindset and importance of respect and how it relates to all aspects of their lives.

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Q2: Lōkahi - Balance & Well Being

Q2: Lōkahi - Balance & Well Being

An exploration into the Hawaiian concept of well-being grounded in a relationship with ke Akua, kānaka, ʻāina & kai. Students are challenged to be intentional and purposeful in fostering those relationships to benefit themselves and thrive in a state of lōkahi.

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Q3: Laulima - Community Contributor

Q3: Laulima - Community Contributor

Students are provoked to grow in their understanding and practice of being community-minded by working on a collective task. They will realize their connection to the larger whole and the power they have to impact and positively contribute to their community.

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Q4: Waiwai - Celebrating Abundance

Q4: Waiwai - Celebrating Abundance

Hawaiians measured wealth and abundance by the amount of food and resources that could be produced and shared. Students celebrate the abundance of the ʻāina by preparing and eating the kalo they helped cultivate throughout the year literally enjoying the “fruits of their labor.”

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schedule

Complete our site visit inquiry to schedule a visit for your organization, group, class or family.

prepare

Learn what your day at Hoʻokuaʻāina will entail and how to optimize your experience.

experience

The foundation of all our programs stems from our core Hawaiian values-based lessons.

reflect

Your voice matters. After your day with us, we invite you to take a few moments to reflect and share.

schedule

Complete our site visit inquiry to schedule a visit for your organization, group, class or family.

prepare

Learn what your day at Hoʻokuaʻāina will entail and how to optimize your experience.

experience

The foundation of all our programs stems from our core Hawaiian values-based lessons.

reflect

Your voice matters. After your day with us, we invite you to take a few moments to reflect and share.

schedule

Complete our site visit inquiry to schedule a visit for your organization, group, class or family.

 

prepare

Learn what your day at Hoʻokuaʻāina will entail and how to optimize your experience.

experience

The foundation of all our programs stems from our core Hawaiian values-based lessons.

 

reflect

Your voice matters. After your day with us, we invite you to take a few moments to reflect and share.

schedule

Complete our site visit inquiry to schedule a visit for your organization, group, class or family.

prepare

Learn what your day at Hoʻokuaʻāina will entail and how to optimize your experience.

experience

The foundation of all our programs stems from our core Hawaiian values-based lessons.

reflect

Your voice matters. After your day with us, we invite you to take a few moments to reflect and share.

Moʻolelo

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Additional Resources

No Nā Nūpepa Hawaiʻi: About the Hawaiian Newspapers
The Hawaiian language newspapers are an invaluable repository of knowledge, historical documentation, and community discourse from the perspective of the subjects of the Hawaiian Kingdom living here in these islands and abroad from 1834 to 1948. During this time, Hawaiians witnessed a great deal of change in their homelands. The newspapers serve as a time capsule for us to read about the events at this time through a truly Hawaiian perspective - the Hawaiian language. Approximately 125,00 pages were printed in total and Hawaiʻi boasted over 100 different newspapers throughout this 114-year span. From the time that the missionaries brought the first printing press with the intention of translating the Bible into Hawaiian, in only two generations, Hawaiʻi was 95% literate. This was the highest literacy rate in the world, along with that of Scotland and England. We went from an oral culture to an entirely literate one, in only 2 generations, corresponding with diplomats and governments around the world. Written and compiled by Johanna Kapōmaikaʻi Stone
Hawaiian Language
Building Upon Kahua Aʻo (University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, College of Education) https://coe.hawaii.edu/kahuaao/hawaiian-language/
Hawaiian Newspaper Translations
Building Upon Kahua Aʻo (University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, College of Education) https://coe.hawaii.edu/kahuaao/selected-articles-for-stem-all/
Hawaiian Nūpepa Collection
Hawaiian Nūpepa Collection (Ulukau) http://www.nupepa.org/
Nā Puke Wehewehe
Nā Puke Wehewehe ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi (Ulukau) http://wehewehe.org/
Papakilo Database
Ulukau
Ulukau: The Hawaiian Electronic Library https://ulukau.org/

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Mentoring Program - Uncle Dean mentoring youth

KŪKULUHOU

mentoring

Internship Program - Seasonal Intern Cohort

KŪKULUHOU

Internship

Education Program - Intern working with school group

KUPUOHI

Grade K-12

ASA College Education Program - Cohort Participants with Lead Farm Manager

KUPUOHI

college

Community Program - Family Working in Lo'i Together

KAIĀULU

Community

Kalo Taro

kalo
taro

ʻŌlelo noʻeau

ʻŌlelo noʻeau are proverbs or wise sayings that hold and reflect the beauty, wisdom, and flavor of the Hawaiian worldview. Here at Hoʻokuaʻāina, we draw from these ʻōlelo noʻeau as springs of knowledge that guide our lessons, decisions, and actions. As we navigate life in today’s world, it is important to look to and learn from the values and wisdom of our kūpuna reflected here.

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KAILUA

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Sources
  • Akana, C. L. and Gonzalez, K. (2015). Hānau Ka Ua: Hawaiian Rain Names. Kamehameha Publishing: Honolulu.
  • Brennan, P. and Allen, J. (2009). Life Along the Streams in Maunawili. In Kailua. (pp. 73-86) Kailua Historical Society.
  • de Silva, K. (2013) Edible Mud of Kawainui. Retrieved from: https://apps.ksbe.edu/kaiwakiloumoku/node/594
  • de Silva, K. (2017). Hiehie Olomana. Retrieved from: http://www.hikaalani.website/uploads/3/4/9/7/34977599/hiehie_olomana_for_hweb.pdf
  • de Silva, K. (2017). Ka Uʻi o Maunawili. Retrieved from: http://www.hikaalani.website/uploads/3/4/9/7/34977599/ka_ui_o_maunawili_for_hweb.pdf
  • de Silva, K. & M. de Silva (2017). Kailua i ke Oho o ka Malanai. Retrieved from: http://www.hikaalani.website/uploads/3/4/9/7/34977599/kailua_i_ka_malanai_for_hweb.pdf
  • Drigot, D. C. (2009). Rice Farming. In Kailua. Kailua Historical Society.
  • Drigot, D. C. (2009). Kawainui Marsh. In Kailua. Kailua Historical Society.
  • Handy, E. S. C, Handy, E. G., & Pukui, M. K. 1991. Native planters in old Hawaii: Their life, lore & environment. Bishop Museum Press.
  • Hikaʻalani. Retrieved from: http://www.hikaalani.website/index.html
  • Kamakakūokaʻāina. Koʻolaupoko. AVAKONOHIKI: Ancestral Visions of ʻĀina. http://www.avakonohiki.org/maps-koolaupoko.html
  • “Ka Uʻi o Maunawili,” words and music by David Kaʻio with Dwayne Kaulia (Hawaiian language), 1990.
  • Retrieved from: https://www.kauluakalana.org/
  • Kipuka Database. (2016). Office of Hawaiian Affairs. Retrieved from: http://kipukadatabase.com/kipuka/Ahupuaa.html?ObjectID=554&b=2
  • Nakuina, M. K. (1990). The Wind Gourd of Laʻamaomao. Kalamakū Press: Honolulu. **Translated by: Esther T. Mookini and Sarah Nākoa
  • Parker, Henry H. A Dictionary of the Hawaiian Language. The Board of Commissioners of Public Archives of the Territory of Hawaiʻi.
  • Pukui, M. K. (1983). ‘Ōlelo No‘eau Hawaiian Proverbs & Poetical Sayings. Honolulu, Hawaii: Bishop Museum Press.
  • Pūkuʻi, Elbert, & Moʻokini. Place Names of Hawaiʻi. 1974, 2004. University of Hawaiʻi Press.
  • Saffery, M. (2009). Ka Uʻi o Maunawili. In Kailua. (pp. 87-91). Kailua Historical Society.
  • Saffery, M. (2009). Pikoakea. In Kailua. (pp. 44-49). Kailua Historical Society.
  • Silva, C. (2009). Kailua in the Mid-Nineteenth Century. In Kailua. (pp. 7-18). Kailua Historical Society.
  • Sterling, E. P. & Summers, C. C. (1978). Sites of Oahu. Bishop Museum Press.
Hookuaaina Rebuilding Lives From The Ground Up

Hoʻokuaʻāina is located in the ahupuaʻa of Kailua at Kapalai in Maunawili on the island of Oʻahu.

For more information about our programs or how you can get involved please contact us.

visit us

916E Auloa Rd.

Kailua, HI 96734

mail

P.O. Box 342146

Kailua, HI 96734

follow us

Hookuaaina Rebuilding Lives From The Ground Up

Hoʻokuaʻāina is located in the ahupuaʻa of Kailua at Kapalai in Maunawili on the island of Oʻahu.

For more information about our programs or how you can get involved please contact us.

visit us

916E Auloa Rd.

Kailua, HI 96734

mail us

P.O. Box 342146

Kailua, HI 96734

email us

Reach Us At:

info@hookuaaina.org

follow us

Hoʻokuaʻāina is a 501c3 Non-Profit Organization

© Hoʻokuaʻāina 2020 All Rights Reserved | Terms & Conditions | Privacy | Site By Created By Kaui

Hoʻokuaʻāina is a 501c3 Non-Profit Organization

© Hoʻokuaʻāina 2020 All Rights Reserved | Terms & Conditions | Privacy | Site By Created By Kaui

Hoʻokuaʻāina is a 501c3 Non-Profit Organization

© Hoʻokuaʻāina 2020 All Rights Reserved | Terms & Conditions | Privacy

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