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Hookuaaina Rebuilding Lives From The Ground Up

Wahi Pana (Sacred & Celebrated Places)

ʻĀLELE
(“it has flown”)

Land area in the approximate center of Kailua, Oʻahu, formerly a plain called Kula-o-ʻĀlele, a sports area.

Parker, Henry H. A Dictionary of the Hawaiian Language. 1922. The Board of Commissioners of Public Archives of the Territory of Hawaiʻi.

Pūkuʻi, Elbert, & Moʻokini. Place Names of Hawaiʻi. 1974, 2004. University of Hawaiʻi Press.

Many stories of Kākuhihewa remind us of the prosperity and splendor during his reign. Peace prevailed throughout the island, farming and fishing provided unlimited supplies of food for all, and population and wealth increased.  The cheerful, beloved Kākuhihewa was greeted by the bravest, wisest, and most brilliant of the aristocracy of the other islands. Kākuhihewa held his residences at three locations: ʻEwa, Waikīkī, and Kailua.  All three areas were lush and well-stocked and accustomed to providing for a very large court and accompanying guests.  A large dwelling was built at ʻĀlele in Kailua that was named Pāmoa to hold court and entertain his many guests.  This area was also formerly known as Kula o ʻĀlele and was located at the center of Kailua, Oʻahu.

Retrieved from: https://apps.ksbe.edu/kaiwakiloumoku/kakuhihewa

Akana, H. (2013). Kākuhihewa.

AWĀWALOA

Peak that “marks the center of Maunawili Valley” (Piliāmoʻo as cited in Saffery, 2009, p. 45)

Saffery, M. (2009). Pikoakea. In Kailua. (pp. 44-49). Kailua Historical Society.

KAʻELEPULU

Ka-ʻele-pulu. Pond (former fishpond), stream, and playground, now called Enchanted Lake, Kai-lua, Oʻahu. Lit., the moist blackness.

Pūkuʻi, Elbert, & Moʻokini. Place Names of Hawaiʻi. 1974, 2004. University of Hawaiʻi Press

KAILUA
(“two seas”)

The ahupuaʻa between Waimānalo and Kāneʻohe in the moku of Koʻolaupoko. Perhaps named so because of Kawainui and Kaʻelepulu, two great fishponds of the area that connect to the sea.

Pūkuʻi, Elbert, & Moʻokini. Place Names of Hawaiʻi. 1974, 2004. University of Hawaiʻi Press.

Kailua

…The eyes looked with eagerness on the plain of Alele where the chief Kakuhihewa vacationed. It was beautiful from the flats of Alaala to the coast of Puunaʻo and Kalaeohua, from the place of the drifting sea weed of Kuahine of the place of the lipoa sea weed of Oneawa. We saw the heiau of Leleiwi; pleasant Kapaa in the mist; Halekou, the pond of fat fish; Kaluapuhi (Eel pit); Waikolu; the famous pond of Kaelepulu where Makalei, the fish attracting stick stood. The necks of the birds appeared on the pond of Kawainui among the rushes…

Huakai Makaikai i na Wahi Pana o Kini Kailua
Oahu Places: Ke Au Hou
Aug. 9, 1911
(Sterling & Summers, p. 227)

“The ahupuaʻa of Kailua and its sources of foods such as the fishing grounds for ahi at Haoʻo, the kahala fish of Poʻo, the fat fishes of the ponds of Kawainui, Kaʻelepulu and Wakahulu, and the salt of Kaluapuhi (Mokapu), belonged to Maui-hope (Second-Maui).”

Kauakahiakahaola (Kamakau)
He manawa haowale anei Keia, a Kaili a pakahawale, Kuokoa, Nov. 27, 1875
(Sterling & Summers, p. 227-228)
Sterling, E. P. & Summers, C. C. (1978). Sites of Oahu. Bishop Museum Press.

The area that included what is now Kāneʻohe and Kailua, which was rich in fishponds and tillable lands, was the seat of the ruling chiefs of Koʻolaupoko (Short Koʻolau) which was the southern portion of the windward coast.

(Handy et. al, p. 272)

Kailua

Kailua was the home of the aliʻi Kualiʻi in the early 18th century, and presumably had been the seat of hte high chiefs of Koʻolaupoko from very early times. The beach, the bay, and living conditions were and are very attractive. Waimanalo and Kaneʻohe [sp], both rich farming areas, were neighboring. Access to the northern districts of Koʻolaupoko was easy over the waters of the great indentation in the coast now called Kaneʻohe Bay, which extends from Kaneʻohe harbord along the whole Koʻolaupoko coast, past Heʻeia, Kahaluʻu, Kaʻalaea, Waiahole, Waikane, and Hakipuʻu to Kualoa. All these districts were rich in agricultural resources and fishing grounds, but were not attractive from teh point of view of residence.

Undoubtedly further reasons for the attractiveness of Kailua as a place of residence for an aliʻi nui with his large entourage were the great natural fishponds, Kaʻelepulu and Kawainui, and the complex of artificial salt-water ponds that are between Kailua and Kaneʻohe in the Mokapu area: Halelou, Nuʻupia, and Kaluapuhi.

Kailua must formerly have been very rich agriculturally, having one of the most extensive continuous terrace areas on Oahu, extending inland one and a half miles from the margin of Kawainui Swamp. Terraces extended up into the various valleys that run back into the Koʻolau range. There were some terraces watered by springs and a small stream from Olomana mountain along the western slope of the ridge that lies southeast of Kawainui Swamp, and another system of terraces was east of the seaward end of the ridge, watered by the stream which joins Kawainui and Kaʻelepulu Ponds. There were also terraces north of the Kawainui Pond, and several terrace areas flanked Kaʻelepulu Pond at the base of the ridge to the eastward. Much former taro land reverted to swamp when abandoned; this has since been drained.

(Handy et. al, p. 457)

Handy, E. S. C, Handy, E. G., & Pukui, M. K. 1991. Native planters in old Hawaii: Their life, lore & environment. Bishop Museum Press.

Kailua i ke Oho a ka Malanai: An Essay by Kīhei and Māpuana de Silva

de Silva, K. & M. de Silva (2017). Kailua i ke Oho o ka Malanai.

Retrieved from: http://www.hikaalani.website/uploads/3/4/9/7/34977599/kailua_i_ka_malanai_for_hweb.pdf

KAʻIWA
(“the frigate bird”)

A peak and ridge above Kaʻōhao, Kailua that is now a popular hiking spot. Named for the Hawaiian frigate bird that hunts fish because they were often seen here.

Pūkuʻi, Elbert, & Moʻokini. Place Names of Hawaiʻi. 1974, 2004. University of Hawaiʻi Press.

KAPALAI

Kapalai is the name of the ʻili ʻāina where Hoʻokuaʻāina is located. The name of the ʻāina Hoʻokuaʻāina stewards is Kapunawaiolaokapalai, the living, lifegiving, healing spring of Kapalai.

An ʻili in the uplands of Kailua.

Parker, Henry H. A Dictionary of the Hawaiian Language. 1922. The Board of Commissioners of Public Archives of the Territory of Hawaiʻi.

At the time of the tax assessment in Kailua in 1846, Kauha was the konohiki (land manager) who oversaw the ʻili ʻāina of Kapalai. At this time there were 6 moʻo ʻāina (parcels) in Kapalai (Silva, 2009, p. 16).

Silva, C. (2009). Kailua in the Mid-Nineteenth Century. In Kailua. (pp. 7-18). Kailua Historical Society.

KAWAINUI

Kawainui Pond

Site 370. Kawainui pond, once a large inland pond.

The pond belonged to the alii. Hauwahine was the goddess (moʻo) of this pond, as well as of Paeo pond, (Site 277 Laie, Koolauloa), where she stayed only when leaves and other refuse (amoʻo) covered that pond. At other times she departed to Kailua. The old Hawaiians at Kailua, however, insist that she never left Kawainui

McAllister
Arch. of Oahu
(Sterling & Summers, p. 230)

Here were found the finest fat mullet on this side of the island. Here also, Haumea, the goddess dwelt with the fish attracting wood, Makalei.

The road cuts through a part of the pond.

The awa fish at this pond were so tame that they were easily caught. The fish did not like persons with strong smelling skins (ili awa) and kept away from them. Otherwise they swam right up to a person in the water.

Alona, Mrs. Charles
Informant, Sept. 28, 1939
Kailua-Waimanalo
(Sterling & Summers, p. 230)

Kawainui

“Many Waters.” A large fresh water pond in Kailua, and famous for the oopu kuia and for having once possessed the famous fish log Makalei. The oopu kuia was a large fat mud fish, caught by many people joining hands and dancing in its waters to stir up mud, when the fish would run their heads up against the people, and so were caught. The fishes would cluster very thickly against particular individuals while leaving many others untouched, when, of course, he or she, would make a good haul and fill up his calabashes rapidly. This gave rise to the common saying of the olden times, “he ili ona ia” – “attractive skin.”

Dictionary of Hawaiian Localities
Saturday Press
Oct. 6, 1883
(Sterling & Summers, p. 230)

Kawainui Pond – Hauwahine

Wahineomaʻo saw two beautiful women sitting on the bank of the stream near Kawainui pond and remarked to Hiiaka, “See those beautiful women?” “Those are not real women, but lizards,” replied Hiiaka. Beacuase of Wahinemaʻo’s disbelief she said, “I will chant and if they remain where they are, then they are human, but if they vanish, they are lizards.”

Then she chanted:

Kailua is like hair tousled by the Malanai wind,
The leaves of the uki are flattened down,
You are startled as though by the voice of a bird.
You think they are human
But they are not.
That is Hau-wahine and her companion,
The supernatural women of peaceful Kailua.

When the lizard-women heard her voice, they glanced at each other as if startled and disappeared. “Now I see,” said Wahinema’o, “those are truly lizard women.” Hiiaka explained, “One, Hau-wahine belongs up here in Ka-wai-nui and is its guardian. The second belongs to the hala grove on the level place close to the stream of Kaʻele-pulu. When she returns from up here the leaves of the hala trees there turn yellow. The leaves of the uki grass and the bullrushes in the water turn yellow too. This is the sign of the presence of a lizard (moʻo). The plants round about take a yellowish hue.”

Hiiakaikapoliopele
Ka Naʻi Aupuni, Jan. 22, 1906
(Similar story in “Hiiakaikapoliopele” Hoku o Hawaii Dec. 29., 1925)
(Sterling & Summers, p. 231)

Sterling, E. P. & Summers, C. C. (1978). Sites of Oahu. Bishop Museum Press.

Edible Mud of Kawainui by Kapalaiʻula de Silva

“Samuel Kamakau writes that the lepo ‘ai of Kawainui was said to have been brought from the Pillars of Kahiki by Kauluakalana, a famous voyager who traveled extensively between the Pacific islands and its peoples.  He explains that this dirt is one and the same as ‘alaea, the ocherous earth used traditionally in medicines, dyes, and as a mineral additive to salt.  Lahilahi Webb, however, states that lepo ‘ai was completely unique unto Kawainui.  She describes it as thick and jelly-like, similar in texture to haupia.  Webb also notes that there was a kapu observed when gathering this resource.  “No one was allowed to utter a word while the diver was in the pond getting it.  If a word was spoken, ordinary mud rose up around the diver and covered him so that he died.  There was no escape” (de Silva, 2013).

de Silva, K. (2013) Edible Mud of Kawainui.

Retrieved from: https://apps.ksbe.edu/kaiwakiloumoku/node/594

For more information about Kawainui, see the following:

KONAHUANUI
(“Large fat innards”)

The tallest peak of the Koʻolau Mountain range. (3,150 feet high) above the Nuʻuanu Pali, Oʻahu. In one story a giant threw his great testicles (kona hua nui) at a woman whom he desired, but escaped him. His genitals then became the peak of Kōnāhuanui. Today the pronunciation is Konahua-nui.

Pūkuʻi, Elbert, & Moʻokini. Place Names of Hawaiʻi. 1974, 2004. University of Hawaiʻi Press.

MAHINUI
(“great strength”)

A mountain, fishpond and stream at Mōkapu, Oʻahu. Name of a legendary hero defeated by Olomana. His body was cast from Olomana to its present location near Kalāheo.

Clark, John. Hawaiʻi Place Names. 2002. University of Hawaiʻi Press.

Pūkuʻi, Elbert, & Moʻokini. Place Names of Hawaiʻi. 1974, 2004. University of Hawaiʻi Press.

MAUNAWILI

He mele kēia o ke aloha no Maunawili
Ua hoʻokamaʻāina au i kou nani
ʻO ka noe i ka wailele i ka piʻina
O ka lā ʻālohilohi i ka wai o uka
Mākaʻikaʻi nō kāua i ka ulu hau
Hōʻolu i ka poli, hōʻoni i ke kahawai
Kū haʻaheo i luna ʻo ke Koʻolau
E hoʻi kāua e pili i ka uka o Maunawili Ua kamaʻāina au i kou nani

This is a mele of love for Maunawili
Where I have grown accustomed to your beauty
The waterfall is misty as the sunrise
Sparkles in the upland water.
We journey through hau grove
And cool our hearts, stirring the mountain stream
Koʻolau stands above
Let us be close once more in the uplands of Maunawili For I have grown accustomed to her beauty.

“Ka Uʻi o Maunawili,” words and music by David Kaʻio with Dwayne Kaulia (Hawaiian language), 1990. (Saffery, 2009, p. 87)

Saffery, M. (2009). Ka Uʻi o Maunawili. In Kailua. (pp. 87-91). Kailua Historical Society.

Ka Uʻi o Maunawili: An Essay by Kīhei de Silva (de Silva, 1990)

de Silva, K. (2017). Ka Uʻi o Maunawili.

Retrieved from: http://www.hikaalani.website/uploads/3/4/9/7/34977599/ka_ui_o_maunawili_for_hweb.pdf

For more information on Maunawili, see the following moʻolelo:

MŌKAPU

(“mō” short for “moku” as in “moku kapu” restricted island/district) This area was kapu, restricted because Kamehameha would meet his chiefs here. Point on the most Kāneʻohe side of Kailua bay that resembles a honu, turtle. The first man is also said to have been created here by Kāne and Kanaloa on the eastern part of Mololani at Mōkapu. Kāne drew the image of a human in the soil, with a body, head, arms and feet just like themselves as gods. Kanaloa then told Kāne that he did not have enough power on his own to bring the human to life. Kāne then appealed to Kū and Lono for help. Kāne then called the man to live, Kū and Lono did as well, and then the soil became a living man.

Pūkuʻi, Elbert, & Moʻokini. Place Names of Hawaiʻi. 1974, 2004. University of Hawaiʻi Press.

Kamākau, Moolelo o Hawaii. Chap 1.

OLOMANA

Olomana: Olomana (“forked hill”) is a beautiful mountain in Kailua, which is very distinct for its three peaks, Olomana, Pākuʻi and Ahiki. Ahiki is the peak closest to Waimānalo. Olomana is the peak closed to Kailua, and Pākuʻi is the middle peak.  

Alona, Charles. (Sterling, E.P. & Summers C. C.) Sites of Oʻahu, pg. 234. 1978. The Bishop Museum Press.

Pūkuʻi, Elbert, & Moʻokini. Place Names of Hawaiʻi. 1974, 2004. University of Hawaiʻi Press.

Hiehie Olomana: An Essay by Kīhei de Silva (de Silva, 2011)

de Silva, K. (2017). Hiehie Olomana.

Retrieved from: http://www.hikaalani.website/uploads/3/4/9/7/34977599/hiehie_olomana_for_hweb.pdf

For more information about Olomana see the following moʻolelo:

PIKOAKEA

Spring found just below Awāwaloa. “The piko, the source of clean pure water that feeds the streams”

(Piliāmoʻo as cited in Saffery, 2009, p. 45)

Saffery, M. (2009). Pikoakea. In Kailua. (pp. 44-49). Kailua Historical Society.

ULUMAWAO
(“growth at the forest”)

A peak in Kailua near Kawainui.

Pūkuʻi, Elbert, & Moʻokini. Place Names of Hawaiʻi. 1974, 2004. University of Hawaiʻi Press.

ULUPŌ

Ancient heiau and now a historic site near Kai-lua, Oʻahu; a large open platform was sometimes attributed to Menehune. Lit., night inspiration.

Pūkuʻi, Elbert, & Moʻokini. Place Names of Hawaiʻi. 1974, 2004. University of Hawaiʻi Press.

For more information about Ulupō, see:

Compiled by Danielle Espiritu, Education Specialist

Hookuaaina Rebuilding Lives From The Ground Up

Hoʻokuaʻāina is located in the ahupuaʻa of Kailua at Kapalai in Maunawili on the island of Oʻahu.

For more information about our programs or how you can get involved please contact us.

visit us

916E Auloa Rd.

Kailua, HI 96734

mail

P.O. Box 342146

Kailua, HI 96734

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Hookuaaina Rebuilding Lives From The Ground Up

Hoʻokuaʻāina is located in the ahupuaʻa of Kailua at Kapalai in Maunawili on the island of Oʻahu.

For more information about our programs or how you can get involved please contact us.

visit us

916E Auloa Rd.

Kailua, HI 96734

mail us

P.O. Box 342146

Kailua, HI 96734

email us

Reach Us At:

info@hookuaaina.org

follow us

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© Hoʻokuaʻāina 2020 All Rights Reserved | Terms & Conditions | Privacy | Site By Created By Kaui

Hoʻokuaʻāina is a 501c3 Non-Profit Organization

© Hoʻokuaʻāina 2020 All Rights Reserved | Terms & Conditions | Privacy | Site By Created By Kaui

Hoʻokuaʻāina is a 501c3 Non-Profit Organization

© Hoʻokuaʻāina 2020 All Rights Reserved | Terms & Conditions | Privacy

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